Sunday, February 23, 2020

Supply Chain Management College Case Study Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Supply Chain Management College - Case Study Example This creates a bottle neck, which is translated in its inability to supply the eight-pack in the market. This creates a substantial loss in consumer sales which could have uplifted the numbers for the sales and marketing department. The inability to run in full capacity leaves some of its products unmanufactured. This can be seen as an opportunity cost for the company. Supply chain is indeed "one of the major areas for companies to gain a competitive edge" and operations is the first step (Lee, 2002). Efficient operations management allows the company to cut on costs through efficient labor and capital use and presents desirable products to the marketing people. The Seven Principles of Supply Chain Management suggests that to "develop a supply chain-wide technology strategy that supports multiple levels of decision making and gives a clear view of the flow of products, services, and information" (David L. Anderson, 1997). The system prepares the company in the short-term, the midterm and the long-term operations. For the daily transaction, this technology will be used to align the "supply" to the "demand" through "sharing of information on orders and daily scheduling" (David L. Anderson, 1997).

Friday, February 7, 2020

Ethical Research Practice Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Ethical Research Practice - Essay Example There is considerable concern about consent issues in relation to groups perceived as 'vulnerable', i.e., where individuals have difficulties in giving initial and continued informed consent because of issues of 'competence'. Groups who are perceived as vulnerable include children and young people, people with mental health problems and people with learning disability. Ethics Committees generally ask that special consideration is given to the ways in which 'vulnerable groups' are accessed and give consent to participate in research to ensure that they understand what participation involves and are not coerced into taking part. The expectation is generally that the researcher should justify the importance of the research and the need to include 'vulnerable' populations and should identify the means whereby informed consent will be obtained - in many cases there will be an expectation that proxy consent (from a parent or relative) may be used to supplement the consent or assent from th e individual who is not seen as competent to give consent in their own right (Baez 2002). It has been argued that researchers should seek consent each time they collect data from a study participant to ensure that they are aware that data are being collected and that they are willing to continue participating in the study.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Grammar school Essay Example for Free

Grammar school Essay As I entered the trading post in a small border reservation community I passed two Navajo youth leaning against the wall, one leg propped behind them for support. They wore black tee-shirts, one declaring â€Å"Indian Pride on the Rise,† the other showing a heavy metal rock group â€Å"Twisted Sister. † Both wore high topped basketball shoes and hair free flowing to their shoulders. One spoke to me. â€Å"Hey, are you the lady who is talking to dropouts? You should talk to me. Im a professional dropout. † I did. And to many others. Their stories spoke of racial discrimination and rejection by teachers. â€Å"The way I see it seems like the whites  dont want to get involved with the Indians. They think were bad. We drink. Our families drink. Dirty. Ugly. And the teachers dont want to help us. They say, Oh, no, there is Another Indian asking a question because they dont understand. So we stopped asking questions. † Their stories spoke of the importance and power of families and the Navajo culture. â€Å"I go crazy worrying about my parents. They need me so us Navajo stick together. I feel kinda proud to be a Navajo. † And their stories spoke of academic and social marginalization in their classes and schools. â€Å"It was just like they wanted to put us aside, us Indians. They didnt tell us nothing about careers or things to do after high school. They didnt encourage us to go to college. They just took care of the White students. They just wanted to get rid of the Indians. † This article is about these Navajo and Ute youth who leave high school. In mainstream research the phenomenon of â€Å"dropping out† is commonly defined as an issue of individual failure (see Note 2). Youth â€Å"fail,† either academically or socially, to make it through school. The problem exists not because of deficiencies in the schools but rather because of deficiencies in individuals and families. Youth who leave school are described as deviant, dysfunctional, or deficient because of individual, family, or community characteristics. Solutions reside on remediating or changing youth and families to better â€Å"fit in. † After all, most youth do succeed in school, suggesting evidence of the school as an effective institution. This body of research ignores the barriers institutions themselves create for youth. Another line of research on dropouts has turned a critical eye towards the role the school and structural barriers play in creating the problem (see Note 3). The research reported  in this article follows this line of inquiry. A critical examination of the â€Å"place† of Navajo and Ute youth in their school and community reveals other reasons than just individual failure for â€Å"dropping out. † Structural factors restricting opportunities, in effect, â€Å"fail† youth. The decision to leave school can then be seen, in part, as a rational response to irrelevant schooling, racism, restricted political, social and economic opportunities, and the desire to maintain a culturally distinct identity. There are many similarities between Indian and other kinds of dropouts. In most  cases, the reasons for leaving school are alike. For example, nearly all dropouts say school is boring, teachers dont care, and school will not help them with what they want to do in life (LeCompte, 1987). Many come from substance abusing families. There are, however, differences between other dropouts and these Navajo and Ute school leavers that only become clear when examining the cultural context surrounding these youth. Cultural and structural factors that might be easy to overlook if only examining â€Å"student characteristics† are important in understanding why many Navajo and Ute youth leave school. Specific to this cultural framework are 1) racial and economic relations in the community and school, 2) home child-rearing patterns of non-interference and early adulthood and, 3) cultural integrity and resistance. The Data Base: Master Student List, Questionnaires and Ethnography In the fall of 1984 1 started an ethnographic study of a border reservation community. I looked at interactions, understandings, and strategies related to education, schooling, success, and failure both in and out of school, among and between three culturally distinct groups of adolescents—Anglo, Navajo, and Ute. Presented here is only one part of this ethnography, focused on school leavers. Throughout this article I use the tribal names, Navajo and Ute, in recognition of the distinctness of these two cultures. I use the term â€Å"Indian† in situations which include both Navajo and Ute for simplicity, not for stereotyping. In addition, fictitious names are used for both communities and schools. These results were produced from four data sets: 1) a master data base from school records; 2) ethnographic field notes and collected documents; 3) interviews with a  convenience sample of school leavers, and; 4) a questionnaire. In trying to determine an accurate picture of the attrition rates in this district, a data base was established to track all of the Navajo and Ute students by name who had attended Border High School (BHS) and Navajo High School (NHS) from 1980-81 to the 1988-89 school year. This master list contained attendance data, grade point averages, standardized test scores, dropout and graduation rates, community locations, current employment situations, post high school training, and type of diploma received for 1,489 youth. This list has been verified by official district records, local Navajo and Ute community members, school officials, and the youth themselves. The graduation and dropout rate in this community was determined by following â€Å"cohorts† of youth throughout their school careers. A total of 629 students forming six different cohorts, from the class of 1984 to the class of 1989, from each of the two high schools are represented with complete four year high school records. Students who took either additional years and/or completed alternative high school degrees are included in the total graduation figures.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Michael Lehmans Heathers and Steve Jodrells Shame :: Films Movies Film Movie

Michael Lehman's Heathers and Steve Jodrell's Shame Throughout time the concept of gender and the corruption of power associated with it has been a very evident problem within society. Many texts have been designed to expose these issues and in particular the feature films’ Heathers, directed by Michael Lehman and Shame, by Steve Jodrell. Both these films have been heavily constructed in order to position us as the audience to take a very negative response towards the concepts of power and gender and further an ‘anti-conform’ attitude. Techniques such as narrative elements and codes and conventions have been used to mould these ideas and attitudes within the texts. Both the films Heathers and Shame can be deemed to be modern day Westerns however are quite subverted. They both develop the idea that conformity leads to tragic consequences. Heathers is set in an American high school, Westerburg, in 1988 and attacks the idea of a high school hierarchy, where four girls particularly one, Heather Chandler, has the power within the school. On the arrival of a new student, Jason Dean, Veronica, one of the four girls breaks away and conforms to Jason. As a result she is led to kill Heather Chandler and later the ‘footy jocks’ to make their school a better place. Shame on the other hand is set in a small outback, Western Australian country town, Ginobrak, in 1987. It deals with the issues of a small town mentality and that ‘boys will be boys’. As result of these concepts and issues, many young girls were raped and the town accepted this. As Asta, an outsider coming into town, stumbles across these rappings’, she helps and encourages a young girl, Lizzie to face the boys and lay legal charges. In both texts it takes and outsider the ‘hero’ figure to expose the corruption and help in acting as a catalyst to change. Gender relationships are a very explored issue within these texts. In a majority, anyone no matter if they are male or female who do not fit in or do not conform to stereotypes to an extent, can be cast out by that group. Whether it is, their looks, their behaviour, the way they dress, or the way they think and feel, they are judged as different. This ‘outcast’ idea is portrayed in both the films. In the two feature films, the most obvious ‘outcasts’ would be the two ‘hero figures’ the intruders into the created microcosm. Michael Lehman's Heathers and Steve Jodrell's Shame :: Films Movies Film Movie Michael Lehman's Heathers and Steve Jodrell's Shame Throughout time the concept of gender and the corruption of power associated with it has been a very evident problem within society. Many texts have been designed to expose these issues and in particular the feature films’ Heathers, directed by Michael Lehman and Shame, by Steve Jodrell. Both these films have been heavily constructed in order to position us as the audience to take a very negative response towards the concepts of power and gender and further an ‘anti-conform’ attitude. Techniques such as narrative elements and codes and conventions have been used to mould these ideas and attitudes within the texts. Both the films Heathers and Shame can be deemed to be modern day Westerns however are quite subverted. They both develop the idea that conformity leads to tragic consequences. Heathers is set in an American high school, Westerburg, in 1988 and attacks the idea of a high school hierarchy, where four girls particularly one, Heather Chandler, has the power within the school. On the arrival of a new student, Jason Dean, Veronica, one of the four girls breaks away and conforms to Jason. As a result she is led to kill Heather Chandler and later the ‘footy jocks’ to make their school a better place. Shame on the other hand is set in a small outback, Western Australian country town, Ginobrak, in 1987. It deals with the issues of a small town mentality and that ‘boys will be boys’. As result of these concepts and issues, many young girls were raped and the town accepted this. As Asta, an outsider coming into town, stumbles across these rappings’, she helps and encourages a young girl, Lizzie to face the boys and lay legal charges. In both texts it takes and outsider the ‘hero’ figure to expose the corruption and help in acting as a catalyst to change. Gender relationships are a very explored issue within these texts. In a majority, anyone no matter if they are male or female who do not fit in or do not conform to stereotypes to an extent, can be cast out by that group. Whether it is, their looks, their behaviour, the way they dress, or the way they think and feel, they are judged as different. This ‘outcast’ idea is portrayed in both the films. In the two feature films, the most obvious ‘outcasts’ would be the two ‘hero figures’ the intruders into the created microcosm.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Radiological Threat to Public Safety

Radiation is a silent death sentence i. e. you cannot see, smell, or taste it. When radiological material ends up in the wrong hands it can become a catastrophic weapon of mass destruction. The public's security against radiological threats is in the hands of federal, state, and local government agencies. These agencies have the responsibility to regulate, mitigate, monitor, and respond to incidents involving sources of radiological materials. An analysis of current radiological threats will provide an improved understanding of potential and creditable radiological threats confronted by the public. Radiological Threat to Public Safety Newswire (2011) states, â€Å"Less than one-third of the population feels they are prepared for a terrorist attack, specifically a radiological attack such as a dirty bomb; yet over eighty percent of Americans feel this type of threat is imminent†. Howard & Forest (2008), suggest that a terrorist radiological attack would come by way of a radiological dispersal devise (RDD) or a dirty bomb i. e. a bomb mixed with radiological material and conventional explosives (p. 90). Oppenheimer (2008) states, â€Å"The threat of nuclear terrorism is far more likely from a radiological dispersal device (RDD)–a conventional IED laced with a radioisotope–than via a nuclear fission weapon†(para 1). Uranium and plutonium are well known elements used in nuclear devises. Howard et al. (2008) states, â€Å"Only uranium and a few other elements, notably plutonium, can be turned into explosive weapons, but many more elements emit radiation† (p. 90). Howard et al. (2008), states, â€Å"Two basic designs of crude nuclear explosives are likely to be adequate for most purposes of terrorist groups intent on nuclear terrorism†(p. 14). The first generation, gun-type nuclear explosive device is similar to the bomb that destroyed the city of Hiroshima, Japan. This is the simplest crude devise to design and construct with a powerful nuclear explosion (Howard et al. 2008, p. 114). The United States Department of Health and Human Services (2011) stipulates that the first step in understanding creditable radiation emergencies is to â€Å"draw the distinction between a nuclear event (like the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan) and a radiological event, such as a nuclear power plant incident or a radiological dispersal device (e. . , dirty bomb)†. The following is suggested credible nuclear and radiological events. Nuclear Events; * Produces a nuclear detonation involving the joining (fusion) or splitting (fission) of atoms to produce an intense pulse or wave of heat, light, air pressure, and radiation. * Highly destructive explosion that instantly devastates people and buildings because of extreme heat and impact of the blast. * Leaves large amounts of radioactivity and fallout behind. Radiological Events; * May involve explosion and release of radioactivity, but no nuclear fission. Typically, have less radioactivity released than in a nuclear event. In both events, the wind direction along with the weather patterns can spread radioactivity over a wide area (DHHS, 2008). Oppenheimer (2008), stipulated that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggested that â€Å"From 1993 to 2004, there were more than 400 confirmed incidents of trafficking materials–arrests and seizures involving radioactive sources–that could only be used to produce a RDD†(para 5). According to Howard et al. (2008) â€Å"no terrorist group has ever fielded or deployed a nuclear devise†(p. 110). However, Oppenheimer (2008) states, â€Å"Only one RDD incident is known: A dynamite bomb laced with cesium-137, a radioisotope used widely in medicine, was planted by Chechen separatists in a Moscow park in December 1995† (para 3). Authorities were able to find the terrorist RDD before it was detonated (Oppenheimer, 2008, para 3). The premise is evident i. e. terrorist organizations have the capability to obtain and deploy a RDD. Howard et al. (2008) suggest, â€Å"A homemade nuclear device, although crude and less efficient than a state military weapon, could very well serve the needs of a terrorist group† (p. 113). Bullock, Haddow, Coppola, & Yeletaysi (2009), describe different types of terrorist events that might include the use of radioactive material. * Introducing radioactive material into the food or water supply. * Using explosives to scatter radioactive materials. * Bombing or destroying a nuclear facility. * Exploding a small nuclear device† (p. 187). Oppenheimer (2008) described and highlighted the unpredictable radiological poisoning of a former â€Å"KBG agent Alexander Litvinenko by polonium-210 in London in November 2006 â€Å"(para 6). This type of radiation, once inhaled or ingested, will cause an illness that is slow and painful. The contamination spread as the Litvinenko moved about London and beyond (Oppenheimer, 2008, para 6). According to Oppenheimer (2008), â€Å"The U. K. Health Protection Agency had the unenviable task of tracing and testing the urine of hundreds of potential contacts and arranging for them to be treated and counseled†(para 6). There were a total of 17 people who were contaminated with radiation at above-average levels (Oppenheimer, 2008, para 6). Oppenheimer (2008) suggests that â€Å"A growing number of smuggling cases since 2002 have involved radioisotopes used in civilian industries and medicine†(para 2). Radioactive materials that are no longer considered useful in medicine could be used in building a RDD or a dirty bomb (The American Nuclear Society, 2005). Some agencies feel as though there has â€Å"not been enough of a concerted effort focused on the threat of a radiological attack such as a â€Å"dirty bomb† (Newswire, 2011). Oppenheimer (2008) describes four attempts at deploying RDD by Chechens i. e. â€Å"deploying an RDD and attacking a nuclear power plant, which are not well documented but are known within the EOD (explosives ordnance disposal) community†(para 1). Hawley (2008) suggests, â€Å"The use of a pharmaceutical grade radioactive material attached to a pipe bomb would release radioactive material†. In addition this small amount of radiation could cause sickness over time. Howard et al. (2008) states, â€Å"Extended exposure to low-level radioactive material increases the likelihood of cellular destruction†(, p. 90). The low level of security at many of Russia’s nuclear power plants and abandoned Russian Northern Fleet submarines has also increased the risk of possible terrorist attacks or takeovers. â€Å"There still are about 120 subs with fueled reactors in need of disposal† (Oppenheimer, 2008, papa 2). If a meltdown or explosion at a nuclear facility ever took place a large quantity of radioactive material would be released into the environment. Employees at the nuclear facility would likely be contaminated with radioactive particles to include injuries from the explosion itself. Individuals who received a large dose of radiation might develop acute radiation syndrome. Individuals in the surrounding area could be exposed or contamination and would need medical assists along with decontamination (Bullock, et al. 2009 p. 233). This huge concern and worry of radiological threats, voiced by the public, might not be credible. This is based on research and analyses performed by numerous agencies. According to Bevelacqua & Stilp (2009), â€Å"Bombings involving storage facilities or transportation vehicle pose the greatest threat†(p. 60). Mitigating potential bombings of critical facilities and transportation is a challenge for federal, state and local agencies. Bevelacqua et al. (2009) states† A nuclear bomb threat is unlikely to be carries out for a number of reasons, including the extreme expense, its logistical difficulty, and the enormous amount of technology necessary to develop a disperse such a devise† (p. 9). Hawley (2008) states, â€Å"The use of an actual nuclear detonation device is unlikely and very improbable given security these materials have† (p. 233). The amount of nuclear material required for an extensive nuclear result and the particular type of material needed makes use unlikely (Hawley, 2008, p. 233). Bullock, et al. (2009) states â€Å"Although a dirty bomb could cause serious injuries from the explosion, it most likely would not have enough radioactive material in a form that would cause serious radiation sickness among large numbers of people. Oppenheimer (2008) suggests, â€Å"There are numerous obstacles to overcome when weaponizing radioactive materials; the same devices that could be a threat to the public also pose potential threats to terrorists†(para 3). Howard et al. 2008, describe the seven myths identified about the threat of nuclear terrorism. 1. Terrorist want a lot of people watching, not a lot of people dead. 2. Nuclear material required to make a bomb are nearly impossible for terrorist to obtain. 3. Difficulties of constructing or stealing a nuclear bomb are unlikely by a terrorist group. 4. The only way a terrorist organization could acquire a nuclear bomb is from a state. 5. The mistaken belief that it is possible to put in place around the United States and other major countries a security cordon that can reduce to a low level the risk that nuclear weapons and material might be smuggled in. 6. The notion that an offensive security posture alone will mitigate the threat of nuclear terrorism. 7. A number of states analysts argue that states would not be especially interested in a stolen nuclear or stolen material to make one, because they want to produce the material for as many nuclear weapons as they need (p. 02). According to Shaw (2001) â€Å"Most studies of preventing terrorist nuclear attacks have reached the same basic conclusion–none of the available basic techniques is sufficiently capable to preclude a successful attack with a high degree of confidence† (p 3). The following are the seven suggested basic techniques: 1. Arms control and related diplomatic measures to control proliferation and access to technology and materials for making nuclear weapons. 2. Physical security and control of existing weapons and materials. 3. Pre-emptive actions. . Deterrent threats of retaliation for attacks. 5. Border controls and related domestic security measures aimed at preventing the movement of weapons or materials into the US. 6. Intelligence collection and law enforcement measures leading to the discovery and apprehension of would-be perpetrators. 7. Effective consequence control and mitigation—still a long way from reality—could be at best a distant second in desirability. Public education on the effects of radiation might allow for understanding the credibility of radiological events. Hawley (2008) states, â€Å"Education on hazards of radiation and the effective use of radiation monitors can ease this fear† (p. 234). There are organizations established to educate radiological protection, challenges, and issues. The Newswire (2011) states, â€Å"The Radiological Threat Awareness Coalition (R-TAC) was established to increase awareness and preparedness in this country against a possible radiological attack such as a â€Å"dirty bomb†(para 1) This synergistic awareness and preparedness was validated successfully by London government agencies responding to prevented a radiological event from becoming catastrophe. Oppenheimer (2008) suggests that the â€Å"London incident response demonstrate that government agencies could rapidly adapt to an unprecedented situation†(para 6). This radiological event also showed that nuclear events are all but impossible to predict. Conclusion The mitigation of nuclear weapons issues remain a heighten concern by free nations. The management of the existing stockpiles in the former Soviet Union continues to be a challenge in addition to the activities of the other governments that control nuclear weapons and demonstrate troublesome behavior especially, Pakistan, North Korea, and Iran (Banks, Nevers, & Wallerstein, 2008, p. 7). According to Hawley (2008) â€Å"there is currently speculation that there are some small nuclear devises missing from Russia; but this has never been substantiated† (p. 233). However, the fear of missing nuclear devises is a weapon itself. According to Hawley (2008), there is an advantage to a noncredible RDD or a small RDD, and that is the public's reaction. The public's perception, and first responders, is that this event would be a radioactive disaster. However, the reality is that the amount of the radiation would not be dangerous, and as time passed, the danger would lessen as the radioactive material decayed to a lesser hazard. Radiation is one of the big unknowns and cause of fear because it is unknown. This fear makes radiation a key weapon for a terrorist organization. Given this analysis, the question continues to be asked. Is there a credible radiological threat? The answer is yes or maybe no. Either way terrorist organizations have instilled fear of possible radiological events in our nation's future.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

bank failures Essay - 1198 Words

http://www.worldnewsstand.net/2001/article/bank_failures.htm Bank Failures We have written before about the remarkable ability of banks to create money when making loans, and of their equally remarkable ability to multiply these newly created-from-nothing bank deposits via fractional reserve banking. What we have written is true, and easily verified. But banks fail! That fact is equally true, and easily verified as well. How can we reconcile these apparently contradictory facts? If banks can create, and multiply, money, how can they fail? Could your business fail if what you made was, literally, money, or what people took for money? The qualifier is important. It is what people assume about money that makes modern banking possible. The†¦show more content†¦But if his borrowed million dollars is on deposit in that bank, the liability of the bank for a million dollars remains. Most banks can probably absorb a million dollar quot;loss.quot; But if the borrower was a foreign government, and the amount created, or loaned, was a billion dollars, thats another matter. When money is loaned, it is created: instant new money, or inflation. When a loan is repaid, the money goes out of existence. Money creation, or lending, is balanced by money annihilation, or repayment. What difference does it make to the bank, then, if a borrower fails to repay? Either way, the money supply is reduced. The difference is interest, which is the banks profit. Merely adding to the money supply with each loan offers no benefit to the bank. The interest on a billion dollars is substantial, however, so to keep that interest coming, the bank will bail out a foreign government which is unable to service its loan. It may not do this directly, but through a bank consortium, or government front, such as the IMF, or World Bank. Again, appearances are important. The bank cannot be seen lending more money to a borrower who has demonstrated his inability to repay, but a group of banks, perhaps under some governmental aegis, can get away with it. You or I would do the same, probably , if we could. For example: if you could loan your brother a million dollars simply by giving him a piece of paper on which you had written ONE MILLION,Show MoreRelatedCauses of Bank Failure6382 Words   |  26 PagesWHY BANK FAILS Introduction Banks are the safest place to keep your cash. Nevertheless, bank failures happen from time to time. Here s a look at what causes bank failures and what you can do about them. The main thing to know in a bank failure is that your money is probably safe. If your money is FDIC insured, you probably don’t need to panic. 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Friday, December 27, 2019

Analysis Of The Necklace - 1358 Words

â€Å"The Necklace† Analysis Plot Analysis - The plot analysis of (Exposition) â€Å"The Necklace† by Guy de Maupassant, take place in the late 1800s when Mathilde Loisel and her husband decides to go to a ball. The importance of the place is so you can fully appreciate how royal Mathilde is supposed to be at the ball, and let me tell you, she pulls it off. She was the most beautiful woman there, but surprisingly it wasn t the necklace that made her shine that night. She already had beauty, all she needed was a splendid dress to wear, gorgeous shoes, and of course her hair beautifully styled for the ball. The main character in â€Å"The Necklace† is considered a round character. She was one of those†¦show more content†¦(Resolution) When Mathilde faces Madame Forestier, she explains how she lost the necklace and how she and her husband went to every jeweller to try to find a necklace exactly like it. However, Madame Forestier interrupts Mathilde by saying that the necklace only cost 500 fr ance, when Mathilde paid a total of 36,000 france over the span of ten long years, to replace the one she lost. I think I would have been sick to my stomach about that. Character Analysis The main character in the story is Mathilde. She was the prettiest one at the ball, fashionable, gracious, smiling with wild joy, and dancing madly. She gave no thought to anything or anyone, as if her head were in the clouds. She was lost in her beauty and full of herself. Mathilde is a round character, she was a charming, pretty girl, born into a family of clerks, as if by a mistake of fate. Poor Mathilde, a beautiful lady that just doesn t have the stuff to show off. Who could blame her for feeling embarrassed? I wouldn t want to invite guests to my apartment either if it was filled with ugly furniture, horrible drapes, and a nasty, unspaced kitchen. Mathilde is also a dynamic character, â€Å"Her friend gave a cry, â€Å"Oh poor Mathilde, how you’ve changed!† All Mathilde could say was, â€Å"Yes, I’ve had a hard time since last seeing you,† (Guy de Maupassant). Mathilde’s whole purpose in the story is that she justShow Mor eRelatedAnalysis of The Necklace Essay883 Words   |  4 PagesBickford English 1102 6 February 2006 Analysis of The Necklace Many women dream of living a rich life, full of luxury, riches and servants. In the short story The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant, a middle-class woman named Madame Loisel desires that life style very much. In The Necklace Madame Loisels vain desires cause many conflicts and her ultimate downfall. One small conflict in the story is Madame Loisel vs. her husband. He is always trying to make his wife satisfied and she neverRead MoreAnalysis Of The Story The Necklace Essay1269 Words   |  6 PagesThe short story â€Å"The Necklace† is one of the most significant stories that I believe the message through it is so powerful for women. â€Å"The Necklace† is a story about a woman named Mathilde Loisel that thought she was supposed to be born into a wealthy family and behaving like one. Unfortunately, the destiny of her life did not match with what she actually wanted—the luxurious life fill with happiness, attentions and jewelries. â€Å"She was one of those pretty and charming girls who are sometimes, asRead MoreLiteray Analysis of The Necklace1155 Words   |  5 Pagesnature of greed. Guy De Maupassant, the author of The Necklace, perfectly shows how greed can lead to bad outcomes in the short story. Guy De Maupassant, one of the fathers of the short story, was born on August 5th 1850. A quote representing the legacy of Maupassant French writer of short stories an novels of the naturalists school who is by general agreement the greatest french short story writers(Bennet). In his short story, The Necklace, Maupassant focuses mostly on greed. He portraysRead MoreAnalysis Of The Poem The Necklace 1263 Words   |  6 Pagespoor Mathilde. But mine was only paste. Why at most it was worth only five hundred francs! Instantly, Mme. Loisel s dull chestnut brown eyes popped out of their sockets like a Jack in a box. Excuse me? She questioned in disbelief The necklace that I had let you borrow was only paste. How foolish would I be to let a middle class woman such as yourself hold possession of my finest jewels? Mme. Forestier chuckled as she mocked Mme. Loisel. Look at you now, Mme. Forestier sympathizedRead MoreAnalysis Of The Book The Necklace 988 Words   |  4 PagesThese unquenchable needs can be demonstrated by the main characters in the short stories â€Å"The Necklace†, which exemplifies the destructiveness of pride and selfishness from a woman that feels entitled and desires what’s beyond her means and the grandmother in â€Å"A Good Man Is Hard To Find† that puts her needs before others at all costs. Although these two stories are completely different in ways that â€Å"The Necklace is written in an earlier time in Paris about a young couples difference in frugalness andRead MoreAnalysis Of The Book The Necklace 1649 Words   |  7 PagesProfessor Lauren Allen English 101-070 11 September 2014 The Value of â€Å"The Necklace† In Guy De Maupassant’s short story, â€Å"The Necklace,† the main character Mathilde Loisel longs to be apart of a greater social class than she currently is. She borrows what she thinks is an expensive necklace from her friend and unfortunately loses it. She spends the rest of her life paying off the replacement necklace only to find out the original necklace was a fake. In the short story, Maupassant uses several key aspectsRead MoreAnalysis Of The Story The Necklace 921 Words   |  4 PagesThe necklace is an interesting story to read despite the fact of how the main character can get under your nerves. While there might be many things that stand out, to me the irony in the story stand out the most and you can find many cases of irony throughout the story. short story for students states that it is ironic that she - Madame Loisel - is excluded from the upper society because of class despite her beauty (short story for students, 5/171); LitFinder contemporary collection states that ifRead MoreAnalysis Of The Book The Necklace 702 Words   |  3 PagesThe neckla ce She removed the wraps which covered her shoulders before the glass, so as once more to see herself in all her glory. But suddenly she uttered a cry. She no longer had the necklace around her neck! Her husband, already half undressed, demanded: â€Å"What is the matter with you?† She turned madly toward him: â€Å"I have --- I have --- I’ve lost Mme. Forestier’s necklace.† He stood up, distracted. â€Å"What! --- how? --- impossible!† And they looked in the folds of her dress, in theRead MoreAn Analysis : The Necklace By Guy De Maupassant873 Words   |  4 PagesSatisfied Yet? An Analysis of Mathilde Loisel Are all the luxuries in the world worth destroying the peace and happiness of the family? Revolving one’s life around money can make or break the love and relationships of life which sometimes can take a lifetime to acquire. The Necklace is set in 1884 in Paris, France (Roberts and Zweig 6; 2). The story mainly consists of a family, which is about a husband, who works in the ministry of education and a stay at home wife named Mathilde Loisel. The storyRead MoreAnalysis Of The Necklace By Guy De Maupassant1355 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"The Necklace† by Guy de Maupassant is a timeless classic symbolizing different themes and meanings. The necklace itself symbolizes the effect of how greed and pride overshadows Matilde’s life, which lead to a series of conflicts. From the beginning to the end of the story, the theme shows that materialistic things do not always make people happy and to appreciate the things in our lives. In the story, the necklace sets a tone of irony because it represents wealth and the upper class, but in the